Anecdotes+Antidotes in B#

Lyrics

(1)

And if chewing gum is chewed
The truant is pursued
And the smoker is bestewed
In the Plaza hotel with an army of 
Aristo-men

Antidotes
And those that vote
Shouting
Anecdotes
And those that vote
It was those that vote
I saw an evil laugh in the Plaza, yes
And the chair in the mirror
Comes over and over

And I met an evil laugh
And what the fuck is on the continents of
Australia and America and Arabia?
Ah...

Antidotes
Antidotes
Antidotes
Have you got

And I’m moving down the train over and over and over again
And the cost of tobacco is chewed
The truant is pursued

I’m walking round the street again and again and again
And you’re sat in your chair pleased
In the mirrors looking at you
From
Antidotes and Antidotes
And those who wrote
Antidotes
And those that vote
Antidotes
And cooking anecdotes

Antidotes

And the chewing gum is chewed
The truant is pursued
And smoking is forbidden again and again and again

And the better knew that God is meek

Notes

1. B# is a strictly notional key (in practice it is identical to C natural). For more information on the lyrics, see the entry for "(Jung Nev's) Antidotes."

Dan:

 

From this song, Knitting Factory, LA, 14 November 2001:
 


And if liberty is screwed, the sports teacher rules. The sports teacher rules. And so secondary modern British Carry-On film, 'Carry On, Sir', 'Carry On, Sir'. No more inner city for you, Jimmy.

^

Comments (12)

dannyno
  • 1. dannyno | 03/04/2013
"Plaza Hotel". Could it be: http://www.cpmanchester.com/location.html?
tom_regazzi
  • 2. tom_regazzi | 19/06/2013
The opening line paraphrases a quote from the Marx Brothers' Duck Soup: "If chewing gum is chewed The chewer is pursued."
bzfgt
  • 3. bzfgt | 19/06/2013
That's all accounted for here:

http://annotatedfall.doomby.com/pages/the-annotated-lyrics/jung-nev-s-antidotes.html
dannyno
  • 4. dannyno | 18/09/2013
"The truant is pursued
And the smoker is bestewed"

I'm hearing:

"The chewer is pursued
And the smoker is pursued"
dannyno
  • 5. dannyno | 14/10/2013
Definitely chewer not truant, throughout.

I'm also hearing "and dozy doats" after some of the "antidotes" - nowhere to be seen above....
russell richardson
  • 6. russell richardson | 08/05/2015
Sorry to be pedantic but B# is indeed a key ( ask someone from Chets) and it sounds like a good exhortation: Be sharp!

'dozy doats' ( I can't tell cos I dot have this record!) could be from the formerly famous nonsense song .... followed by' a kiddly-divey too, wouldn't you?' from the 1940s: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mairzy_Doats
bzfgt
  • 7. bzfgt | 26/06/2015
I don't know who Chet is but B# would be C natural--there is no incidental between B and C.

I have the "doazy doats" stuff on the "Jung Nev" page, which I lazily linked to rather than pasting the notes here.
russell richardson
  • 8. russell richardson | 15/07/2015
more B-sharp crap:
it's a key only in theory, but that's sometimes necessary for musicologists and composers (like the sq root of -1 is for mathematicians)

The key of B# major is extremely complex and quite unnecessary because it sounds like C major. And that by using two sharps and five double sharps. But it exists: in the field of philosophy. The following quotation from the book »Ketzereien« (heresies) of Günther Anders is a nice example of the use of musical terms in communication. Using B# major as a paraphrase for complex speaking is answered with B# minor as a paraphrase for discretion.

but yeah, it's the same sound as C major, instead of having no accidentals, it has three sharps and five double sharps. yes indeed.
bzfgt
  • 9. bzfgt | 17/07/2015
This is all interesting stuff, I revised my note. It's 5 i the morning so I didn't get in deep or for long, but it looks like it's basically an exercise in writing music (no one would use a score in B# because it would be taking the easiest key to read and making it the hardest). So in that case there is a key of "E# too of course. I always assumed that the proper doctrine was that B and E sharp don't exist, but I can see someone revising this (a purely nominal move) for the sake of making the system more strictly formal--you don't need to consult content, you just follow a rule and everything comes out right, it's kind of like logic.
nairng
  • 10. nairng | 22/07/2015
"I met an evil laugh" seems like a mishearing of "I led an evil life", first line of Race With The Devil by Gene Vincent, covered by the Fall elsewhere.
bzfgt
  • 11. bzfgt | 24/07/2015
Yeah, maybe, although elsewhere it's "I saw an evil (?)" and maybe "laugh" is wrong but "life" wouldn't fit perfectly there either. "Lad"? I dunno, the lyric is a legacy from Lyrics Parade and ot attested elsewhere, this will have to be closely considered...
dannyno
  • 12. dannyno | 04/03/2017
From this song, Knitting Factory, LA, 14 November 2001:


And if liberty is screwed, the sports teacher rules. The sports teacher rules. And so secondary modern British Carry-On film, 'Carry On, Sir', 'Carry On, Sir'. No more inner city for you, Jimmy.


https://sites.google.com/site/reformationposttpm/pithy-smithyisms/in-the-2000s

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