Cyber Insekt

Lyrics

Film of film on book-rack
Book of film
Book on station track (1)
Cyber Insekt 

Cyber Insekt Cyber Insekt
Yellow moth fly (2)
Cyber Insekt

On rack

Cyber Insekt Cyber Insekt
Yellow moth fly
Cyber Insekt

Come on back

Film of book
Film book-rack
Book of film
Book on station rack

Cyber Insekt Cyber Insekt
Yellow moth fly
Cyber Insekt

On rack

Cyber Insekt Cyber Insekt
Yellow moth fly
Cyber Insekt

Come on back

Purple in its glowingness
Golden roasting in its duly knowing

Book of film
Book on station track
Book of book with soundtrack

Cyber Insekt Cyber Insekt
Yellow moth fly
Cyber Insekt

On rack

Cyber Insekt Cyber Insekt
Yellow moth fly
Cyber Insekt

Come on back

Cyber Insekt
In its escarpment
Burning over all planes and trains

Cyber Insekt Cyber Insekt
Yellow moth fly
Cyber Insekt

Station clack

Cyber Insekt Cyber Insekt
Yellow moth fly
Cyber Insekt

Bring on station track

Cyber Insekt Cyber Insekt
Yellow moth fly
Cyber Insekt

Station clack

Cyber Insekt Cyber Insekt
Yellow moth fly
Cyber Insekt

Break on station track

Notes

1. According to Julia Nagle, the song was written in the aftermath of the notorious onstage incident in New York City when MES brawled with Karl Burns and the whole band (Nagle excepted) wound up quitting:  "'The song Cyber Insekt, is about that time in New York in 1998. We (our lawyer. Mark and myself) said the whole incident had been incredulous [sic], and we should write a book about it. And being in America, we then laughed about making the "film of the book, of the film" etc, which in turn became the lyrics, if that makes any sense.' And on the preview of the album, Nagle says it's  'about the virtual world of communication. There was a plan behind this: to work it live, rather than program it. It's bubbly.'" (Fallnet)

The song is often assumed to refer to a paperback on sale at a train station, which seems plausible.

On the version from the DVD The Fall--A Touch Sensitive: Live MES sings "Book of train, train of book."

Leosfi points out that the drum pattern is copied from Sweet's "Ballroom Blitz."

^

2. Backing vocals on the chorus are by Julia Nagle and guest Kazuko Hohki from the Frank Chickens. On the rough mix, Nagle sings alone and the lyric is clearly "yellow moth fly," as given above. However, on the album, however, there seems to be an extra syllable on the chorus--perhaps "yellow metal fly," in any case that gives the cadence, but its hard to make out. Nagle told me via email that "yellow moth fly" is correct, but it's possible that Hohki said something different, or added a nonsense syllable such as "yellow moth-a fly."

^

Comments (8)

harleyr
  • 1. harleyr | 06/02/2013

Perhaps this is too obvious to bother saying but I reckon Smith was also thinking about those racks of cheap sci-fi paperbacks you used to get at major railway stations in the UK. Lines like 'Purple in its glowingness' bring to mind the colourful painted covers of those books, for me at least.

bzfgt
  • 2. bzfgt (link) | 23/02/2013

Yes, that seems likely; thanks for the comment.

Karl B.
  • 3. Karl B. | 31/10/2014

My first impression on hearing this was to be reminded of Milan Kunderas testaments betrayed book,an analysis of kafka and his legacy.im probably quoting wrong, but Kundera suggests kafkaology exists to kafkaologise kafka.that is to render kafka more kafka.kafkas slim body of work compared to the mountains of analysis published yearly about his work.books on books on film on books.

Leosfi
  • 4. Leosfi | 06/02/2016

The drum pattern is a sample from "The Ballroom biz" by Sweet.

bzfgt
  • 5. bzfgt | 19/03/2016

What do you mean the drum "pattern" is a sample? You mean the drums are a sample, or the pattern is copied from BB?

bzfgt
  • 6. bzfgt | 19/03/2016

OK, I listened and I don't think it's a sample, it's just copied.

Martin
  • 7. Martin | 07/04/2017

Is there a reason why we assume that the word "duly" is the one actually sung? I can't make any sense out of it if it is, and maybe "jewelry" could be the word actually used. However, "jewelry knowing" doesn't make that much sense either, so maybe I'm going down a cul-de-sac here.

bzfgt
  • 8. bzfgt (link) | 06/05/2017

Martin, "Duly knowing" makes perfect sense to me: "knowing, as might be expected of a cyber surveillance insect" for instance, vs. "jewelry knowing" which makes no sense to me at all.

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