Cab It Up

Lyrics

Cabbing it uptown
You're moving it uptown
You taxi it uptown uptown

And you're moving it southwest 
You're cabbing it uptown
You're moving up sideways sideways

And you're cabbing it uptown uptown

Cabbing it uptown

Your business friend
Your business friend's Australian
And when he comes it's Götterdämerung! (1)

But you're cabbing it uptown
You're moving up south now
You're moving it uptown uptown
Sideways sideways

Main strips! Main strips!

People going, people going
Moving it uptown

And locked in the door bins (2)
Slowly slowly

Jump in! Jump in!

You're cabbing it uptown uptown

But you know the best, Dan (3)
I dunno where I am
I feel like crying

But cabbing it uptown
You're moving up sideways
Moving up slowly
You're cabbing it uptown

(Taxi! .....)

You'd better cab it up slowly

Moving in circles
A Shepherd's Bush man (4)
Eats from a can
He taxi it southwest southwest
He moving it uptown uptown

Uptown Uptown

You'd better cab it up slowly
You'd better taxi it slowly
You'd better cab it slowly
You'd better cab it up

Jump in! Jump in!
Michael! Michael! (5)

 

 

Notes

1. Götterdämmerung means, in German, "twilight of the gods." It comes into German as a rendering of Ragnarok, which literally means "fate (or 'end') of the gods," or Ragnarøkkr, which means "twilight of the gods." In Norse mythology (our knowledge of which is mostly derived from the Eddas), Ragnarok is a final cataclysm, including battles and natural disasters, that heralds the end of the current cycle of world history. Richard Wagner may have coined the term (it's hard to say, since German is particularly amenable to combined terms such as this); in any case, he brought it into common usage in 1876, when his Götterdämmerung premiered (it is the fourth and final installment of his four-opera cycle The Ring of the Nibelung [Der Ring des Nibelungen]). The term often refers to a tragic doom or a final cataclysm, and is often used in a humourous or exaggerated manner, as Smith does here. Friedrich Nietzsche, who early in his career was a friend and disciple of Wagner's, lampooned Wagnerian (and, in general, German) bombast when he entitled one of his last works Götzen-Dämmerung ("Twilight of the Idols"). On the Peel version, we learn that the business friend "looks like Charles Atlas" and "worships Bob Dylan." In this context, the latter seems to me to be a peculiarly thoughtful predilection for the character in queston. And, although in context the bodybuilder Charles Atlas seems to be the obvious reference above, the Michael Clark Company has included, since about 1984, a filmmaker and lighting designer of that name.  

^

2. In British English, a "bin" is a trash receptacle.  

^ 

3. A mysterious "Dan" also appears in "Hip Priest."  

^

4. Shepherd's Bush is in western London. In Fall lyrics, anything from southern England, particularly London, often carries a negative connotation.  

^

5. Refers to Fall collaborator Michael Clarke, the choreographer behind the ballet I Am Curious, Orange. The Fall accompanied the dancers live, and the album I am Kurious Oranj is the soundtrack of the ballet that almost shares its name.

Dan reports this statement from MES in the New Musical Express:

"Like there's a song 'Cab It Up' in there which was originally intended to be about William Of Orange living it up after he'd got to London. But it's turned into a song about Michael Clark and his mates, full of gross insults. They haven't realised that yet. Ha ha!" 
 

^

 

Comments (1)

dannyno
  • 1. dannyno | 13/05/2016

From NME, 17 September 1988 (http://thefall.org/gigography/88sep17.html):


"Like there's a song 'Cab It Up' in there which was originally intended to be about William Of Orange living it up after he'd got to London. But it's turned into a song about Michael Clark and his mates, full of gross insults. They haven't realised that yet. Ha ha!"

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