To Nk Roachment: Yarbles

Lyrics

(1)

[Full credit for the room next door
Found the party assembled on the landing 

Everyday you have to die some
Everyday you have to cry some (2)
For the rumour
All the good times are past and gone (3)
Wipe the tears from your eyes some

[They found full credit in the bathroom
The presence was voluminous]

Everyday you have to die some
Everyday you have to cry some
All the good times are past and gone....

 

Notes

1. This song bookends This Nation's Saving Grace, which opens with "Mansion," an instrumental version of the same song, and closes with this one. "NK Roachment" suggests "encroachment," and "yarbles" is taken from A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess. In the invented language of the book, yarbles are testicles.  

Russell points out:

"A situation in real estate where a property owner violates the property rights of his neighbor by building something on the neighbor's land or by allowing something to hang over onto the neighbor's property. Encroachment can be a problem along property lines when a property owner is not aware of his property boundaries or intentionally chooses to violate his neighbor's boundaries. This is also known as structural encroachment. Encroachment problems are sometimes resolved with a simple conversation, but other times these problems must be taken to court. Because of this, potential homebuyers are advised to avoid properties with encroachment issues."

^

2. The lyrics and melody here are taken from "Every Day I Have To Cry Some," written by Arthur Alexander and recorded by Steve Alaimo, who had a minor hit with it in 1962, and covered by a whole bevy of artists, including Dusty Springfield, Johnny Rivers, and the Bee Gees. Alexander himself finally recorded the song in 1975. The chorus: "Everyday I have to cry some/ Everyday I have to cry some/ Dry the water from my eyes some/ Everyday I have to cry."

Another source with which MES would have likely been familiar is "Home of the Brave" on Lou Reed's Legendary Hearts album, which includes the lyric "And everyday you have to die some/Cry some and die some."

^

3. "All the Good Times are Past and Gone" is an American folk standard, and appears in various iterations, complete with "floating" verses (verses shared by other songs). The song was recorded by Fred and Gertude Gossett in 1930, although it surely predates this version, and the Monroe Brothers recorded it in 1936. It has become a bluegrass staple, and has seemingly been recorded by nearly all the chief purveyors of the genre, including Bill Monroe (with the Blue Grass Boys, after the bluegrass era began), Jimmy Martin, Flatt and Scruggs, Ralph Stanley, and Del McCoury.

^

 

Comments (11)

nochmal
  • 1. nochmal | 02/05/2013

This helps absolutely nothing at all in unveiling the semantic meaning of the title, but the way I have always thought of the syntactic sense of it is that the singer/character is basically saying "bollocks!" to encroachment. Yeah, I know, then we are exactly as far.

dusty
  • 2. dusty | 09/05/2013

Hi, I was wondering if anyone could explain to me what they reckon this song's about? I'm a bit lost in trying to connect the meanings of the 'rumous', 'full credit', 'the landing' and the 'illuminous' 'presence' in 'the bathroom'? Cheers!

bzfgt
  • 3. bzfgt | 10/05/2013

Hey, Dusty, this is one of those times when my site falls short. Some of the lyrics are cryptic, to say the least. Anyway I return to these and rework them as I get the chance, so perhaps some progress will be made on that front. anna

dannyno
  • 4. dannyno | 15/07/2014

Doesn't the song end on "past and gone"? I'm not hearing the final die/cry some that appears here.

Zack
  • 5. Zack | 10/05/2015

The lead vocal track, if we can call it that, is mixed louder on "Wonderful And Frightened Part 2 (Rough Mix)", and here's what I hear:

Full credit for the room next door
Found the party assembled on the landing
They found full credit in the bathroom
The presence was voluminous

russell richardson
  • 6. russell richardson | 10/05/2015

This very boring but.... if we take 'mansion' (my new house) and 'encroachment' (with Paintwork) as on one level at least being about moving from a rented flat to an earned/owned house... then these are some of the utterly trivial details you need to work out (boundaries, garden limits, who's responsible for the slugs etc, which might well drive a person of 'bohemian' sensibility around the twist. Legal letters about whose hedge it is? which pink half of the drainpipe? Yarbles, indeed.

russell richardson
  • 7. russell richardson | 10/05/2015

Videlicet:

How to drive MES round the twist:

A situation in real estate where a property owner violates the property rights of his neighbor by building something on the neighbor's land or by allowing something to hang over onto the neighbor's property. Encroachment can be a problem along property lines when a property owner is not aware of his property boundaries or intentionally chooses to violate his neighbor's boundaries.
This is also known as structural encroachment.

Encroachment problems are sometimes resolved with a simple conversation, but other times these problems must be taken to court. Because of this, potential homebuyers are advised to avoid properties with encroachment issues. Property owners wishing to make changes near their property lines may want to talk to their neighbors and/or have a land survey done to make sure the work falls within their own property's boundaries.

Surely someone from the Halifax could have pointed this out?

Read more: http://www.investopedia.com/terms/e/encroachment.asp#ixzz3Zkxbe6Oc
Follow us: @Investopedia on Twitter

dannyno
  • 8. dannyno | 30/03/2016

It probably ought to be noted that the track "Home of the Brave" on Lou Reed's "Legendary Hearts" album, includes the lyric:


And everyday you have to die some
Cry some and die some

Luciani
  • 9. Luciani | 08/10/2016

I always thought it was
"Wipe the tears from your eyes son"

bzfgt
  • 10. bzfgt | 15/10/2016

Yeah that's what I thought too and I can't remember why it says the other above. But I haven't listened in a while and I'm not sure what it sounds like now, I'll check it again at some point since we both think it may be wrong.

bzfgt
  • 11. bzfgt | 15/10/2016

OK I am listening and it sounds to me slightly more like "some" but not definitive by any means. So inertia dictates it stays for now.

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