Hot Aftershave Bop

Lyrics

(1)

Hot aftershave bop
Canisters from orange box
Bop aftershave shock
Courtesy orange box
Hey diggy diggety dog (2)
Hot aftershave bop
Furniture defrost
Bop aftershave hot
Hot aftershave bop

Hey stranger I love you a lot
Hey baby I love you a lot
But here is us moaning
Digging in our pocket again
Are these your English friends?
Fill the blender to the top again
Hot aftershave bop
Hot spirit shave slop
Bop aftershave hot

Here is us moaning
Digging in our pockets again
Any man or anything
Laid flat by shave shock
Bop aftershave hot
Hot aftershave bop

 

 

Notes

1. Zack makes a helpful comment, although I cannot agree with his assessment of the relative merits of this and "The Aphid":

"This appears to be an attempt at writing a 'dance craze' style song, and altogether a more successful one than 'The Aphid,' written several years later. MES has a 'thing' about shaving. 'The amount of times he made me and Steve [Trafford] shave, he's not a beard man (laughs),' said former Fall guitarist Ben Pritchard. Fans were surprised when MES allowed the heavily bearded Rob Barbato into The Fall in 2006 and were even more surprised when MES appeared unshaven in public for perhaps the first time in his career at a gig in Coventry on May 1, 2014."

^

2. Dan points out that our collective consciousness knows of "hot diggety dog," and of course we will think of this when we hear this phrase. According to Wikipedia, "The phrase 'hot diggity dog!' dates to at least 1928, when Al Jolson was recorded saying 'Hot diggity dog! Hot kitty! Hot pussycat! Didn't I tell you you'd love it?' after a performance of the tune 'There's a Rainbow 'Round My Shoulder.'" And an entire book has been written about the origin of the phrase "hot dog." I will not attempt to summarize it here, but the enterprising Fall scholar has been given enough hints that she may profitably explore on her own.

^

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Comments (9)

Zack
  • 1. Zack (link) | 07/12/2016
This appears to be an attempt at writing a "dance craze" style song, and altogether a more successful one than "The Aphid" written several years later.

MES has a "thing" about shaving. "The amount of times he made me and Steve [Trafford] shave, he's not a beard man (laughs)," said former Fall guitar Ben Pritchard (interview linked above). Fans were surprised when MES allowed the heavily bearded Rob Barbato into The Fall in 2006 and were even more surprised when MES appeared unshaven in public for perhaps the first time in his career at a gig in Coventry on May 1, 2014.
bzfgt
  • 2. bzfgt | 27/12/2016
Ha, if you mean aesthetically more successful, I prefer "The Aphid" hugely!
bzfgt
  • 3. bzfgt | 27/12/2016
Well, I actually received fan mail about the original note, which read in its entirety "Mostly just nonsense, I think." But you have improved the site here, I can't deny it, even if your ears turn to cloth when it comes time to compare this with "The Aphid."
Zack
  • 4. Zack | 28/12/2016
"Aftershave" is a proper tune with proper vocals. "Aphid" is some drunk guy slurring over a riff we already heard earlier on the album. I know which Fall Dance Craze song I prefer. (smiley face)

Your "mostly just nonsense" note was great; you should keep it!
dannyno
  • 5. dannyno | 28/01/2017
" a proper tune with proper vocals"? Urgh.
bzfgt
  • 6. bzfgt | 11/02/2017
" 'a proper tune with proper vocals'? Urgh."

Stop it.
dannyno
  • 7. dannyno | 26/02/2017
"Hey diggy diggety dog"

The usual phrase is "hot diggety dog", which seems relevant in the context of the song title.

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/hot_diggety_dog
bzfgt
  • 8. bzfgt (link) | 03/03/2017
Yes, quite. I always thought of "HDD" without it quite penetrating my ego-awareness.
bzfgt
  • 9. bzfgt (link) | 03/03/2017
An outtake:

The origin of the term “hot dog” has been debated for well over 100 years, with many of the theories centering on the resemblance of the sausage in the bun to a dachshund dog as the source of the name. You’ll find many sources online and in print that credit the invention of the term “hot dog” to the early 20th century newspaper cartoonist T.A. Dorgan, who did draw at least one cartoon of “hot dogs” as dachshunds in buns in 1906.

The Dorgan thing is of course false.

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