No Respects Rev.

Lyrics

(1)

The Lords of the Senses (2)
Were coming up
Typical side road
It was fast and cold
It was fast and cold
On a day of old
Georgioso, (3)
Coming down!
Had to move
Had to move
No respect for Judy (4)
No respect
For the lonesome cove (5)
No respect
Laughing you go
Fast and cold
You go on your roads
Censoring yourself 
Embracing your curtailment  (6)
The judge of your soul, God
We appreciate him (7)
In twelve years of repast

For twelve years in fast
For twelve years in fast
For twelve years in fast
For twelve years in fast
Respects
Going around
Reverberating
In eldritch and neon
In judge of your soul's realm
The god and the dashed
Damned
In the words of...aaa...
In twelve years
Do you think
And set up some cove 
Location in Whitby (8)
Engländer Schweinhund
Why are you here?
Why are you here?
Why are you here?

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Notes

1. This song was (supposedly, can we be forgiven for a pinch of skepticism?) the result of a contract that almost produced one of the oddest cultural pairings one could imagine--the Fall and the Twilight franchise:

“Our publisher got this deal with that film Twilight. They said they'd give us $50,000 to come up with a song. So I said, I'll give them some horror…”

The contract dictated payment whether they used the song or not. They didn't, of course. “They don't know anything about horror, do they? It might frighten the children. But it is frightening, isn't it? I've fulfilled my bargain with Satan…” He clears his throat, leans forward, gesticulates. “There's no way they're going to put that in Twilight. But if they were good, they would. Orson Welles would've done it. It's horror.” He growls out the word, as if grinding it to dust. “Their horror is some guy like him” – he gestures to some young men behind us – “wandering through a forest with his eyes glazed.”


Despite Smith's proclamation above, I'm unsure how helpful it is to think of this song as a horror story. The lyrics are mysterious and hard to work out, and it is possible that the horror angle is a red herring (however, see note 8 below). In any case, this is unfortunately one of those cases where the reader may get less help from me than she came here looking for.

Since the title is "No Respects," rather than "No Respect" (which Rodney Dangerfield made famous as a catchphrase), it is possible that the meaning of the phrase is a refusal to pay respects. Thus, if it is a vampire story, perhaps what is intended is that the vampires do not pay respects to those they kill, having no respect for them, or that it is inappropriate to pay respects to someone who is thought to be dead, because they are in fact now a vampire, and not really dead after all. 

The song first appears as an instrumental, simply entitled "No Respects," which opens Re-Mit. I assume "Rev." stands for "Revisited."

Of course MES's taste in horror runs more to Lovecraft than Twilight, and as Zack points out, "eldritch" is one of Lovecraft's favorite adjectives (like "gibbous," as Zack also mentions).

^

2. "Lord of the Senses" is sometimes applied to Vishnu (the Indian city Rishikesh got its name from a reported theophany on the site; Rishikesh means "Lord of the Senses"). It seems to me this is more promising as a possible source for the phrase than it is as a clue to its meaning, however. Twilight vampires have enhanced perception, as is usual in such tales, and it is possible the appellation suggests something of that sort. As I suggested in note 1, however, I wouldn't bet the farm on it. 

It is also somewhat plausible to read Nietzschean themes into the lyrics; in that case we could read the "Lords" as something like the lords or nobles from the ancient world that Nietzsche describes in On The Genealogy of Morals, a type that recognizes itself as higher and more noble than its plebian counterpart, and showing "no respects" for those who "Go on your roads/Censuring yourself/Embracing your curtailment," which could be a description of the priestly type in Nietzsche. Furthermore, this would not be in contradiction with a vampire theme, since vampires in fiction often see themselves as a higher type living among bestial humans.
 
It has been suggested, however, that this is perhaps "The Lords of the census." This I doubt, but cannot refute... 

^

3. With a few exceptions such as this one, I have mostly followed the first attempt at a transcription, by the27points on the Fall online forum which has "geology of soul" here. Smith's diction is fast and slurred, and it sounds more like "Giorgioso." Trying to get something to fit, I discovered that one of the first historical personages to be suspected of being a vampire, one Jure Grando who lived in the 17th century in what is now Croatia, was originally buried, and subsequently confronted (according to legend) by a priest named Giorgio. This opens up another possible interpretation of the song's title: "No Respects, Rev[erend]."

Dannyno writes in the comment section: "Vlad the Impaler (aka Dracula) was most probably imprisoned at Oratia for 12 years. There is a place in Romania called Giurgiu. There is a statue of Vlad there, and somewhere in the area he was killed. Or "killed"."

Dan reports that on the "Mighty Fall" Facebook page, a photograph appeared with sheet of paper in Smith's handwriting that reads, more or less:

 

NO, RESPEKTS

Theme proposed.

For 'Twilight'

film.

It was fantastical [or fantastico ) ]

(Androgonronsou [Androngenous?]

georgioso

it was getting cold

 

Note I have "judge of your soul" 13 lines down (around note 7), which may also be "Georgioso." 

It's also possible MES got "Georgioso" from here and is having us on. If that's the case we must abandon all hope!

^

4. Take "Judy" with a grain of salt, as I am unsure of it. Also, see Brendan's suggestion below that "Judy" could in fact be "G.B."

 ^

5. While this usage is now rare (except, apparently, in Australia), "cove" can mean a "chap," "fellow," or "dude." It seems plausible that this is how MES uses it above, since it would be odd to disrespect (or to refuse to pay respects? see note 1) to a sheltered body of water. However, also consult note 8 below.

^

6. See note 2 above. It has been suggested that "censuring" may be "censoring," which my ears tell me is entirely possible.  ^

 

7. This echoes the "he is not appreciated" refrain of "Hip Priest" and "New Big Priest."  

^

8. Here we have a vampire connection: parts of Bram Stoker's classic horror story Dracula are set in Whitby, which is in Yorkshire. In the previous line, "cove" is presumably now being used in the sense of a body of water (which may, but probably does not, indicate this is the usage above also), as Dracula arrives in Whitby on a ship, having despatched the crew before landing. There is a "Smuggler's Cove" at Whitby. In 2012 there was a story in circulation about a real-life "Whitby Vampire" who had just arrived in town; the details of the story are the usual sort of thing, and no one seems to have taken it all that seriously.

Dan's comment comes pre-packaged with its own disclaimer:

"'The Secret of Lonesome Cove' is a 1912 novel by Samuel Hopkins Adams. I merely note the fact, which appears to be a red herring."

^

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Comments (23)

world's smallest midget
  • 1. world's smallest midget | 21/06/2013
I'm still skeptical of the Twilight story.
For one I'm not sure if The Fall are in particularly good standing with the Twilight fans, not to mention the fact that this is probably the least horrifying song on the album.

It's a good track though, innit?
Brendan
  • 2. Brendan | 07/08/2013
Some people think "Judy" is actually "G.B."

"No respects for G.B." could tie in with "Englander Schweinhund." But when I hear it it sounds like "Judy".
dannyno
  • 3. dannyno | 20/08/2013
Vlad the Impaler (aka Dracula) was most probably imprisoned at Oratia for 12 years

There is a place in Romania called Giurgiu. There is a statue of Vlad there, and somewhere in the area he was killed. Or "killed".

Dan
dannyno
  • 4. dannyno | 21/04/2014
There was a Judi Bowker who stars in a 1977 film adaptation of Dracula:
http://youtu.be/s_JK8uIywJM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Count_Dracula_(1977_film)

I did wonder if we might find some of the dialogue in the film, but...
bzfgt
  • 5. bzfgt | 23/04/2014
Yeah, and I still wonder if this vampire stuff isn't a red herring. I read somewhere else that a few of the Re-Mit songs were offered for the movie, not just this one. I have no idea whether it is even a theme in the lyrics, which are obscure and we don't even know what they are. I am hoping that some day there will be some kind of breakthrough with this one...
dannyno
  • 6. dannyno | 24/04/2014
According to MES in his "British Masters" interview with John Doran, it was instrumentals that were submitted for the movie.
SM
  • 7. SM | 06/07/2014
Two things regarding note 5:

1. The 'lonesome cove' may be in line with the Whitby line (as you have it in note 8) and the idea of 'paying respects to a body of water,' a cove in the sense of a body of water, may be metonymy. The person is located in Whitby, Smuggler's Cove stands in for Whitby, The Cove itself then stands in/refers to the 'vampire'. I would not put it past Smith to 'naturally' use language in this way, which may seem convoluted to some.

2. The reason I thought about this possibility is that it makes sense. But also it came to mind as I thought about the usage of 'cove'. Being Australian, I've never heard anyone use the word 'cove' in the archaic sense mentioned in note 5.
dannyno
  • 8. dannyno | 07/05/2015
"The Secret of Lonesome Cove" is a 1912 novel by Samuel Hopkins Adams. I merely note the fact, which appears to be a red herring.
harleyr
  • 9. harleyr | 08/12/2016
For Georgio's soul I hear...
Judge Your Souls realm

which might fit in with the vampire/horror theme.
bzfgt
  • 10. bzfgt | 27/12/2016
That might be right, Harley, I'm really unsure of this song and it bugs the hell out of me. I feel like we need some evidence from MES or something. It could be "Judge of your soul, come on down!" which would be kind of a cool line. But it does sound more like "Giorgio" to me, as baffling as that is. It's the vowel--it's much more "o" than "u." Of course with the way he pronounces things it could be anything, really. I'm going to listen to this a few times and see if I can justify changing it to "judge of your soul."

By the way, this song really, really kicks ass...I haven't listened to it in a while and it is really hitting me hard right now!
bzfgt
  • 11. bzfgt | 27/12/2016
OK, the last time he says it I here "judge." That's enough for me (for now), I going to get that damned "Giorgio" out of here! Now awaiting approval or correction or rebuke or more avowals of confusion from my readers...
bzfgt
  • 12. bzfgt | 27/12/2016
The more I listen to it the righter it sounds. That "Giorgio" has been driving me crazy for 4 years now, thank you Harley!!!
Zack
  • 13. Zack | 28/12/2016
"Rev" almost certainly stands for "Revisited." See also: "And This Day (Revisited)", a 1997 live recording included on the Expanded Edition of Hex.
bzfgt
  • 14. bzfgt | 04/01/2017
Yeah I thought "revisited" was the only thing it could be, in fact I didn't realize it needed a note since it seemed so transparently that. That happens often, something doesn't even jump out at me as in question but on closer examination it could arguably have a note.
bzfgt
  • 15. bzfgt | 04/01/2017
I don't know where my CD is. Is it "No Respects Rev." or "No Respects rev."? Wikipedia doesn't have a capital letter but Discogs does. Or is it different in two different spots or something?
bzfgt
  • 16. bzfgt | 04/01/2017
Oh, sorry, I actually already did say that in the notes! I just took from your post that I didn't.
dannyno
  • 17. dannyno | 06/01/2017
This has been posted on the Facebook "Mighty Fall" page:

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10155032333548115&set=gm.1207451295957931&type=3&theater

It's a picture of a piece of paper in MES' handwriting, reading:


NO, RESPEKTS

Theme proposed.

For 'Twilight'

film.

It was fantastical [or fantastico ) ]

(Androgonronsou [Androngenous?]

georgioso

it was getting cold
bzfgt
  • 18. bzfgt | 28/01/2017
Ha! We'd just changed to "judge of your soul" and I was feeling a bit settled about it. Christ. I am not sure but that one of them does not say "judge of your soul," if I recall correctly there was only one that really sounded like it convincingly. If so that will never be figured out, unless--or I guess especially if-- there's a green lyrics book in the works.
bzfgt
  • 19. bzfgt | 28/01/2017
I cannot see the page, by the way, maybe it's a national thing. It says:

Sorry, this content isn't available right now
The link you followed may have expired, or the page may only be visible to an audience you're not in.
bzfgt
  • 20. bzfgt | 28/01/2017
There's no Twilight character named Georgioso that I can find, and it doesn't mean anything in Italian, at least not spelled that way.
Zack
  • 21. Zack | 06/03/2017
"Eldritch," like "gibbous" and "unutterable," is yet another one of HP Lovecraft's favorite words: http://arkhamarchivist.com/wordcount-lovecraft-favorite-words/.
bzfgt
  • 22. bzfgt (link) | 19/03/2017
It certainly is.
dannyno
  • 23. dannyno | 20/03/2017
Note #19:

Here's the image for those who can't see it in Facebook:

Image

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