Xmas With Simon

Lyrics

(1)

Do not fret, rest your head, Jesus had no fear
Do not fret, rest your head, Xmas time is here

Castle in the snow, Southern white sign
No explanation for the lights
Empires were tumbling, pity the people in the desert
Jesus did
Pity the people who had too much dessert

Jesus
Big old nice old house
It's Christmas
In old English village
Jesus
It's that time again
It's Christmas
And those films again

Born in a barn
Surrounded by animals
No set amount to the number of diseases
Died at the age of 33
Which is as good a time as any
White outside
Bowl of light glows
Slow march of the humble
Wrong shall fail and the right prevail  (2)

Jesus
Big old nice old house
It's Christmas
In old English village
Jesus
It's that time again
It's Christmas
And those films again

Do not fret, rest your head, Jesus had no fear
Do not fret, save your breath, Xmas time is here

Jesus
Big old nice old house
In old English village
With candles in it
Jesus
It's that time again
And those films again
Jesus
It's Christmas
House of gold
Castle in the snow
Jesus
It's Christmas
Jesus
It's Christmas

 

Notes

1. "Simon" is Fall drummer Simon Wolstencroft, who plays keyboards here as the following remarks (thanks to Reformation) make clear:

Andy Peart in an interview with MES ("Badmouth Strikes Again", Sounds; 8 December 1990):
 
"...the hilarious 'Xmas With Simon' again dispels images of Smith as the archetypal dour Mancunian, showcasing a deeply sarcastic view of the festive season laced with some cheeky cheap keyboards. But The Fall writing a Christmas song? Surely not.
 
[MES] 'Most people record their Christmas singles in January and I thought, If we're going to force the record company to bring out a single before Christmas, we might as well write a festive song. It features Simon on keyboards, which is quite shocking in itself but I like things like that. It is a cynical song. Atrocious lyrics!
 
'The outside opinion of The Fall is that we have no sense of humour but someone who's into The Fall understands the humour within the songs. That's the secret of our accessibility. I find extreme sarcasm very funny indeed.
 
'I must admit I don't like Christmas in England because everywhere closes down for three weeks. It's disgusting. You can't get any bread or milk and that's what the song's about. Christmas is more of a family time... where families can beat each other up.'"
 

I find it extremely hard to believe that anyone who listens to the Fall for more than 30 seconds can be of the opinion that the band has no sense of humor, much less this being some sort of consensus among those "outside" the band, and I doubt it's actually true, but it is certainly possible that a critic or two has said this about the band. Whoever did clearly disqualified anything else they have to say about the Fall from serious consideration. 
 
A reworked version of this called "Christmastide" appeared with bonus material on one of the releases of Levitate.
 
 
2. Zack informs me this is "a line from the poem 'Christmas Bells' by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, which was later adapted into the Christmas carol 'I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day.' MES fave Johnny Cash recorded a version in 1963.
 

Comments (2)

dannyno
  • 1. dannyno | 24/07/2014

The second "Do not fret" goes like this:

"Do not fret, rest your head, Jesus had no fear
Do not fret, save your breath, Christmas time is here"

And the last "big old nice old house" is "With candles in it", rather than just "With candles"

Zack
  • 2. Zack | 26/01/2017

"The wrong shall fail, the right prevail" is a line from the poem "Christmas Bells" by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, which was later adapted into the Christmas carol "I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day." MES fave Johnny Cash recorded a version in 1963.

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