Groundsboy

Lyrics

(1)

He goes back now

Every day on the airstrip
Noticed by none
Noticed by none!
Downed enemy pilots
They were dispatched!

Groundsboy
Groundsboy
Treated like scum
Groundsboy
Checker! Checker!
Groundsboy
Checker! Checker!

Property!
Property
R.R.A.A.F. (2)
Say cut it, grass...
Cut the grass!
Cuh-cuh-cuh-cuh-huh-huh-huh-
He's so boss!
Groundsboy

Groundsboy
Groundsboy
Noticed by none
At least he was...
He was the last lad to turn
And the rock stars who had judges as fans
And shoots as many as me
Groundsboy
Groundsboy
Checker! Checker!
Checker! Checker!
Groundsboy
Checker! Checker!
Checker! Checker!
Groundsboy

Oo, duh doo...
Ow! Ow! Ow!
Property R.A.A.A.F.
 

Notes

1. Some have pointed out the fact that Steve Hanley's post-Fall job was groundskeeper at a school as a possible inspiration for the title, if not the song. 

This was originally titled "Groundsboy and the Two Amendments." Dan points out that the protagonist would seem to occupy some kind of junior position at an airstrip.

^

2. R.A.A.F.=Royal Australian Air Force. Earlier the groundsboy is said to be laboring on an airstrip...

^

More Information

Comments (16)

bzfgt
  • 1. bzfgt (link) | 05/08/2017
"He goes back now"

Maybe.
bzfgt
  • 2. bzfgt (link) | 05/08/2017
"Checker! Checker!"

Also maybe, it may be nonsense like Cheka! Cheka! or Chucka! Chucka!
bzfgt
  • 3. bzfgt (link) | 05/08/2017
I want to say it could be the sound of fire from the Aussie air force, like "chukka! chukka!"

No?
dannyno
  • 4. dannyno | 05/08/2017
Steve Hanley would more commonly be known as a caretaker, rather than a groundskeeper. So "groundsboy" probably isn't inspired by his post-Fall job.
dannyno
  • 5. dannyno | 05/08/2017
"Groundsboy" would seem to be some kind of junior position on an airstrip.

We should note that the song was originally listed as "Groundsboy and the Two Amendments".
dannyno
  • 6. dannyno | 05/08/2017
... I mean, "groundsboy" isn't only used of airstrip connected positions, but since there's an air theme to the lyrics, that definition seems to fit.
Maldoror
  • 7. Maldoror | 06/08/2017
I definitely hear "Eat some grass!"
Could be in an attempted Aussie accent?
Rik
  • 8. Rik | 06/08/2017
I hear - piss on graaasss. Not -he's so boss.
bzfgt
  • 9. bzfgt (link) | 16/09/2017
I would usually take "caretaker" to mean either someone sort of "grounds-sitting," or someone taking care of an old person...I don't know, but he was sort of a groundskeeper, wasn't he? Or a maintenance man?
bzfgt
  • 10. bzfgt (link) | 16/09/2017
I don't know, this may be another one where I wind up outvoted but it really sounds much more like "He's so boss!" to me. I mean, he says "grass" numerous times, and none of the others seem to end in "-oss" except this one.
Tonmeister
  • 11. Tonmeister | 01/11/2017
"At least he was... He was the last lad to turn" - might reinforce this as at least partly referring to Steve Hanley...
dannyno
  • 12. dannyno | 02/11/2017
Hanley was in the Air Cadets at school, of course. I'm a bit suspicious of linking this kind of thing to old bass players so long after they left the group. It's a bit like the idea you sometimes get that any song about a woman must be about Brix, as though MES never met another woman. And Hanley's book came out in 2014. It all feels a bit too long ago, really. But that doesn't mean there's no link at all, just that there's not really much textual evidence to support a link.
bzfgt
  • 13. bzfgt (link) | 11/11/2017
Dan, you're really obsessed with this idea lately that MES will not address anything over a year old in his lyrics.
bzfgt
  • 14. bzfgt (link) | 11/11/2017
In any case didn't MES say something like this, like "I never expected Hanley to turn" or "At least he stuck it out for so long," or both? It has a nagging familiarity.
dannyno
  • 15. dannyno | 14/11/2017
bzfgt, comment #9:


I would usually take "caretaker" to mean either someone sort of "grounds-sitting," or someone taking care of an old person...I don't know, but he was sort of a groundskeeper, wasn't he? Or a maintenance man?


Ah, well maybe this is a British thing. Hanley was a school caretaker, I think - a position still commonly found, but I suppose it's a role that is changing. Not untypically they lived in a house or flat within the school grounds, and their job was indeed a mixture of groundskeeper and maintenance man. They would open and close the school, fix radiators, cut the grass, mend broken windows, act as security, etc etc. I guess "site manager" would be a modern description, except traditionally caretakers were very hands on - it was a manual or technical role, I suppose, rather than a managerial one.
dannyno
  • 16. dannyno | 14/11/2017
Would "janitor" be an equivalent term, at least partly? Maybe "building superintendant"?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Janitor

Here's a job description from the uk: http://www.skillsforschools.org.uk/roles-in-schools/caretaker-site-manager

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