The Classical

Lyrics

(1)

There is no culture is my brag, (2)
Your taste for bullshit reveals a lust for a form of office
This is the home of the vain!
This is the home of the vain!
Where are the obligatory niggers? (3)
Hey there fuckface!
Hey there fuckface!
There are twelve people in the world
The rest are paste  (4)
This is the home of the vain!
This is the home of the vain!
I just left the Hotel Amnesia, I had to go there
Where it is I can't remember,
But now I can remember...now I can remember
Hafta! Hafta!                (5)
Message for ya! Message for ya!
Too much reliance on girls here
Behind every shell-actor
[queer and deformed]
Is raw power
Snobbier, snobbier
Too much romantic here
I destroy romantics, actors,
Kill it!
Kill it!
Kill it!
Kill it!
Kill it!    (6)
You won't find anything more ridiculous, than this new profile
razor unit, made with the highest British attention to the
wrong detail, become obsolete units surrounded by hail. (7)
The Classical!
The Classical! 
The Classical!  (8)
Hotel Aggro!
Message for ya! Message for ya!
The Classical! 
Parallax! (9)
One of the millennium of conspiracy,
Forever,
I know it means a lot of stomach gas, (10)
I know it means a lot of stomach gas
I've never felt better in my life
I've never felt better in my life
Parallax!
The Classical!
Stomach gas
I've never felt better in my life
I've never felt better in my life
Parallax!
Millennium of conspiracy
Play out Classical!
I've never felt better in my life
Better in my life  (11)

Notes

1. MES talks about the song in an interview with Sounds:

"When we recorded that album we were sick of the music industry, the record was meant to be against that. It was our way of saying 'fuck off!' to those people. "The Classical" is the song that sums it all up, it's the anthem of the record. I figured: if you want to say it, you might as well do it in the first song. We were tired of the whole thing at the time, thought about packing it in. We were fed up with the whole thing. The ironic thing is that the record was intended as a piss off, but everyone loved it!" 

Many readers have noted that this song seems to be a bash at the BBC or some such thing. From the liner notes to Hex Enduction Hour: "Spite does not enter into this. But R. Castle in his uselessgoals h.q. shadowed by Parachute suite style youths, plus the canned response to C. James (recent tv) Cast a diff. hue to this tune." (Thanks to Zack)

Dan points out: Presumably "R. Castle" is Roy Castle, of the TV show "Record Breakers", and "C. James" is "Clive James", the writer and TV presenter.

2. Dan points to a passage from Jose Ortega y Gassett's The Revolt of the Masses (1930):

"'Is it not a sign of immense progress that the masses should have "ideas," that is to say, should be cultured? By no means. The "ideas" of the average man are not genuine ideas, nor is their possession culture. Whoever wishes to have ideas must first prepare himself to desire truth and to accept the rules of the game imposed by it. It is no use speaking of ideas when there is no acceptance of a higher authority to regulate them, a series of standards to which it is possible to appeal in a discussion. These standards are the principles on which culture rests. I am not concerned with the form they take. What I affirm is that there is no culture where there are no standards to which our fellow-man can have recourse. There is no culture where there are no principles of legality to which to appeal. There is no culture where there is no acceptance of certain final intellectual positions to which a dispute may be referred. There is no culture where economic relations are not subject to a regulating principle to protect interests involved. There is no culture where aesthetic controversy does not recognize the necessity of justifying the work of art.'

Now, that's not a 'brag,' but someone could pick up on that passage and decide, contrary to the intention, that actually they would affirm that there was no culture and a good thing too."

^
 

3. This is probably the most controversial Fall lyric of all time. Whether or not the use of the word is justified, it seems clear MES is being heavily sarcastic here. Apparently a British subsidiary of Motown expressed interest in the Fall a few years later and were sent a recording of, of all things, "The Classical." The story goes that the label ultimately demurred, proclaiming that they could see "no commercial potential in this band whatsoever." Here's Smith's version of the story:

"We were just fuckin' around," recalls Smith. "Then fuckin' Tamla
Motown steam in! You know... about time we had another white act,
ha ha! Dead funny. But they were pretty serious. I went to see them
and everything. They had a pretty good lad in London who was well
behind us. So they offered us a contract and this bloke in London
goes, Have you got any LPs? So I said, I'll get a copy of 'Hex
Enduction Hour' to you."

This is an unfortunate lyric although admittedly it looks worse now than in 1982, since "nigger" has become a word that is pretty much forbidden in all contexts, to the point where I even hesitated a bit to use it in this sentence. MES did comment on this in a 1983 interview, but unfortunately for those of us who want him to say something unequivocally anti-racist to balance this out, he just makes things worse:

"Well that song was written about a year ago, about what was happening then and what has resulted in the kind of music programmes you get on TV now...the sort of coziness of vanity, not vanity in a good way, not even vanity where you know what you're saying. "The Classical" was just like--you throw it around you know, the only thing is where is the classical. What I was really saying in that song was that things that have any real value about them will last through any time scale. But it sounds cheap to say it like that. There was stuff like 'obligatory niggers' and that, which has like come true, and every programme you see about young people has now got a black boy in it, I have to make a joke about that, I can't help it."

Naturally, he's asked about the Falklands next, in particular an interview with an Irish woman where he made several remarks about the war. He explains that he sounded very patriotic in this interview because he was goading the Irish interviewer, and adds that "no black man's going to come in my home and call me the oppressor, cause if I've got any call with the English working class...the English working class created this country so that those fuckers could come over here and complain about it, I have no guilt about them, its only the middle class and upper middle class who have any guilt about the blacks and Irish, do you know what I'm saying? and I don't like people pulling that on me...black people and Irish people come over here and think they're being oppressed, the English working class know that as a fact...Do you know what I mean, no black man's going to come over to me and say "You are the fuckin' oppressor," because I've never oppressed him, as far as I'm concerned he's oppressing me, because I have to watch his music on TV and I don't particularly like it, it's another way of looking at it..."

He follows up by complaining that the "Irish" interviewer should have noted "He was being very sarcastic" when quoting him. It may be the case that a similar note would apply here...not that these comments go down easy either way.

While the Fall brought the song back in 2002, the offending line stayed in the 80s...

^ 

4. "Paste" here could be in the sense of imitation jewelry.

From "Fortress" on 9/12/1981 in Iceland: "There are twelve people in the world, the rest are slates!"

Clay perceptively points out that this could be an allusion to the Lamed Vavniks ("thirty-sixers") or Tzadiqim Nistarim ("hidden righteous"). This is a legend from the Babylonian Talmud (Wikipedia):

As a mystical concept, the number 36 is even more intriguing. It is said that at all times there are 36 special people in the world, and that were it not for them, all of them, if even one of them was missing, the world would come to an end. The two Hebrew letters for 36 are the lamed, which is 30, and the vav, which is 6. Therefore, these 36 are referred to as the Lamed-Vav Tzadikim. This widely-held belief, this most unusual Jewish concept is based on a Talmudic statement to the effect that in every generation 36 righteous "greet the Shechinah," the Divine Presence (Tractate Sanhedrin 97b; Tractate Sukkah 45b).

This line may be inspired by a Captain Beefheart quote, "There are forty people in the world, and five of them are hamburgers."

^

5. Colloquially "have to! have to!" I think. SteveQ associates this line with Nietzsche:  "I would like to see here the need for a short, snappy sound and Mark using and slightly bending an equally enigmatic phase from Also Sprach Zarathustra (which is referred to in 'Free Range,' although that refers to the Music by Strauss via 2001, A Space Odyssey). The line came to Nietzsche in a dream and so may not be relateable to any actual phrase or name: 'Alpa! cried I, who carries his ashes unto the mountain? Alpa! Alpa! who carries his ashes unto the mountain? " (From 'The Soothsayer'). I mention this line because it is remarkable fragment- for its vocal qualities - and could have lurked in Smith's notes waiting for the right moment..."

And Zack adds "SteveQ's note about the possible Nietzsche connection between 'The Classical' and 'Free Range' is interesting because the two songs have similar chord progressions, tempi and declamatory vocals. 'Free Range' is essentially a '90s update of 'The Classical.'"

^

6. From deruntergeher on the Fall Online Forum:

Adapted from a line in The Producers ? ( a film MES was a big fan of I think)

Max: Kill the actors!
Franz: Kill the actors? I can't kill the actors. I must destroy the actors.

^

7. On live versions, variant lyrics often would appear at this point. One more or less typical example (from Austurbaejarbio, recorded in 1982): "Dear customer, prior to delivery, this fine Ford Kawasaki Excel Escort was given a thorough inspection by Fred here in the white coat...please note, um, the, um, coin-spots on the dashboard...please note the fuel exhaustion limit reader...please note the elephant house odor of the dashboard, and most importantly the axles and the hubs which are immune to snow, extreme heat, rain, hailstones, sleet, and HAIL! The Classical!"   

Harleyr perceptively remarks, "I've always taken 'hail' here to be a picturesque way of describing the nuggets of white polystyrene packaging that would probably surround said obsolete consumer products." And of course this provides, as above, a hinge back to the title phrase via another meaning of "hail."
 

^

8. Up to this point, the guitar plays a two-chord pattern over the bassline, which is four notes. From this point on, the changes played by the guitar match the bass riff.

^

9. The orange lyric book and the Lyrics Parade have "Pole-axe." A plethora of fans insist on "parallax" (see comments below, and also the discussion on the Fall online forum), and my ears agree. A pole-axe (pollaxe) is a long-handled axe used in Medieval combat. Parallax is the apparent displacement of an object resulting from a shift in perspective, and is used by astronomers to measure distances. The Parallax View  is a 1974 movie starring Warren Beatty as an inquisitive reporter who gets in hot water investigating a senator's assassination, and, more recently (i.e. post-Hex Enductiuon Hour) a book by Slovenian philosopher Slavoj Žižek. 

^

10.  The Fall covered the Mason WIlliams instrumental "Classical Gas" twice in 2002, or at least Ben Pritchard strummed some of it. Craig Scanlon was reported to have also sometimes played the song; musically, "Classical Gas" bears no resemblance to "The Classical."  

^

11. Live versions often contain the interjection "Walks tall! Walks tall!" Thanks to Mark in the comments for clearing that up; the closest I could come was "Rock salt! Rock salt!"

^

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Comments (55)

dannyno
  • 1. dannyno | 03/06/2013

"I just left the Hotel Amnesia, I had to go there
Where it is I can't remember,
But now I can remember...now I can remember"

Isn't this often taken to be a reference to the lyrics of The Eagles' Hotel California?:

"Last thing I remember, I was
Running for the door
I had to find the passage back
To the place I was before"

conrad
  • 2. conrad | 23/06/2013

it's 'paralax ("a displacement or difference in the apparent position of an object viewed along two different lines of sight...measured by the angle or semi-angle"),' not 'poleax.' I'm pretty sure there's no such word as 'poleax.'

John
  • 3. John | 02/08/2013

Conrad said it. I hate the poleax interpretation. It's totally parallax. A poleaxe is a type of military weapon. Add the e and spellcheck is happy.

bzfgt
  • 4. bzfgt | 02/08/2013

I'll listen again, I thought "parallax" when I was first hearing the song but the Lyrics Parade convinced me otherwise. I'll listen again when I get a chance.

As John points out, "poleaxe" is definitely a word.

Colin
  • 5. Colin | 22/10/2013

It's parallax.

Martin
  • 6. Martin | 29/10/2013

It's definitely "parallax" on the first recorded performance of the song (7 December 1981).

Joseph Mullaney
  • 7. Joseph Mullaney | 02/06/2014

I've always heard it as `form of office'.

Joseph Mullaney
  • 8. Joseph Mullaney | 02/06/2014

Should be:

Too much reliance on girl here
Behind every shell-actor
(overdubbed voice: `queer and deformed')
Is raw power, snobbier, snobbier

I also hear `in home obsolete units, surrounded by hail' rather than `become obsolete...'

bzfgt
  • 9. bzfgt | 15/06/2014

Yes, good corrections. "Form of office" is very clear on some live ones.

Can someone tells me what he says repeatedly at the end of live versions? It sounds like "rock salt, rock salt!" but sometimes seems to be not exactly that.

Mark
  • 10. Mark | 16/06/2014

bzfgt: I hear "Walks tall! Walks tall!".

bzfgt
  • 11. bzfgt | 24/06/2014

Outstanding! I'm quite sure that's it!

dannyno
  • 12. dannyno | 03/07/2014

"Too much reliance on girl here
On girls here, behind every shell-actor"

On the Hex version, at any rate, there's only one "on girls here" at that point.

Zack
  • 13. Zack | 03/11/2014

The Mick Middles book contains the more mundane truth behind the Fall/Motown story, but I'm glad the internet continues to "print the legend."

bzfgt
  • 14. bzfgt | 08/11/2014

All Middles says about it is that it was a British subsidiary of Motown, which is what I have in the note. He doesn't say one thing or another about why they didn't sign the Fall.

Hanley in his book says it was because of lack of commercial viability, but he doesn't contradict the story that they were sent Hex, and I haven't seen anyone deny this, so what is the legend exactly?

Or do you mean elsewhere on the internet? I took you to mean my note, but if that isn't what you mean then never mind...

Jill N
  • 15. Jill N | 20/06/2015

Ha ha! I can actually add info I don't see provided here....a first: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0071970/?ref_=nv_sr_2

The Parallax View. Warren Beatty. Crazy paranoid (and rightly-so) guy sees something he shouldn't have....

Jill N
  • 16. Jill N | 20/06/2015

NEVER MIND!!! I missed note 6. DUH!

bzfgt
  • 17. bzfgt | 17/07/2015

Don't be discouraged, everyone comes up with something eventually, there's so much going on...

SteveQ
  • 18. SteveQ (link) | 24/09/2015

Re the very cryptic "Hafta, Hafta". I would like to see here the need for a short, snappy sound and Mark using and slightly bending an equally enigmatic phase from Thus Sprach Zarathustra (as was referred to in "Free Range" - although that refers to the Music by Strauss via 2001, A Space Odyssey). The line came to Nietzsche in a dream and so may not be relateable to any actual phrase or name:
"Alpa! cried I, who carries his ashes unto the mountain? Alpa! Alpa! who carries his ashes unto the mountain? "
(From "The Soothsayer").

I mention this line because it is remarkable fragment- for its vocal qualities - and could have lurked in Smith's notes waiting for the right moment...

clay
  • 19. clay | 12/11/2015

Re. footnote 3 ('there are 12 people in the world/the rest are paste'): this line seems, to me, to be highly suggestive of the mystical Jewish idea of the Tzadikim Nistarim.

From Wikipedia: "It is said that at all times there are 36 special people in the world, and that were it not for them, all of them, if even one of them was missing, the world would come to an end." (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tzadikim_Nistarim)

Jorge Luis Borges refers to this idea in either a short story or one of his essays (I can't remember which), which is where I first heard about it. If it was something that had been translated at the time, it seems possible that MES would have read it, as Borges was world-famous by the early 80s, and his writing seems like something MES would have enjoyed, given what I know about his literary proclivities.

Obviously this is all highly speculative, and even if it were true I don't think it would really help with a broader interpretation of "The Classical", which has always seemed to me to be the one song on Hex that isn't really about anything...

bzfgt
  • 20. bzfgt | 15/11/2015

SteveQ: excellent stuff I added that to the note. I don't know if you're thinking this but I also assume it's a colloquial "have to, have to!" which I always thought too obvious to mention but I should actually mention it maybe...

bzfgt
  • 21. bzfgt | 15/11/2015

Clay, wow! You're right, I never thought of that! I've always heard them called "Lamed Vavnik" (which just means, basically, "thirtysix-sters").

harleyr
  • 22. harleyr | 04/05/2016

"obsolete units surrounded by hail" - I've always taken 'hail' here to be a picturesque way of describing the nuggets of white polystyrene packaging that would probably surround said obsolete consumer products.

dannyno
  • 23. dannyno | 25/06/2016

"Paste": do we need to say that the reference here is to glass-imitation jewels?

dannyno
  • 24. dannyno | 25/06/2016

"Millennium" has two "n"s.

Zack
  • 25. Zack | 28/06/2016

Hex liner notes re: "The Classical":

"Spite does not enter into this. But R. Castle in his uselessgoals h.q. shadowed by Parachute suite style youths, plus the canned response to C. James (recent tv) Cast a diff. hue to this tune."

Anyone?

bzfgt
  • 26. bzfgt | 29/06/2016

Yes, Dan, we do. I had not thought of that at all but now you say it it seems very likely the correct connotation, so I'd say it's precisely the sort of thing we need mention.

bzfgt
  • 27. bzfgt | 29/06/2016

Zack: Not I.

dannyno
  • 28. dannyno | 02/07/2016

Zack: presumably "R. Castle" is Roy Castle, of the TV show "Record Breakers", and "C. James" is "Clive James", the writer and TV presenter.

M.S. Pierce
  • 29. M.S. Pierce | 08/10/2016

"Parallax"? "Poleaxe"? I don't hear either of those.

I have always heard "Prolapse", which is found in at least two other Fall songs.

bzfgt
  • 30. bzfgt | 15/10/2016

Just only today I was thinking "Now I think it really sounds like 'Poleaxe,' that seems to make more sense as he has just been yelling 'Kill it!', and it's in MES's own damn lyrics book...how did I ever get talked into 'Parallax'??" And now this....someone needs to invent technology that can detect exact phonemes and I can put in the exact phonetic thing in these cases. In any case "Prolapse" will be considered and may eventually unseat the others...I think I should revert this back to the Lyrics Book though, if anything.

Zack
  • 31. Zack | 03/12/2016

SteveQ's note about the possible Nietzsche connection between "The Classical" and "Free Range" is interesting because the two songs have similar chord progressions, tempi and declamatory vocals. "Free Range" is essentially a '90s update of "The Classical".

SkrikingFucker
  • 32. SkrikingFucker | 01/02/2017

I think I can shed some new light on the "obligatory niggers" line...

I found a three hour interview with MES right around the time he finished Hex. Like, the day after. MES mentions the use of the N word, and the way he explains it is that he wanted to use the vernacular of the type of talk he heard in pubs. The fact people actually used that word so casually sitting around having a pint. And he wanted to shock all the other bands around at the time that he saw as posturing.

My memory is a bit hazy tbh, but the interview is amazing. Pre Brix, pre speed addled rants, pre bitterness. The podcast was by a guy called bobcast, search and you'll find it there.

bzfgt
  • 33. bzfgt | 11/02/2017

SF, do you have any idea where in the interview this appears? That is one horking long interview...

bzfgt
  • 34. bzfgt | 11/02/2017

I'm almost 20 minutes into the interview. If MES explicitly addresses this line, that is huge, considering all the debate about it. But I'm flagging here, does anyone by chance actually want to listen to this thing? If so I would be enormously grateful.

dannyno
  • 35. dannyno | 11/02/2017

He addresses the "issue" in the Allied Propaganda interview here: http://thefall.org/news/pics/83aug-sep_alliedprop/83aug-sep_alliedprop.html

It's still nonsense.

MarkC
  • 36. MarkC | 11/02/2017

I'd thought it was prolapse since I first heard it

bzfgt
  • 37. bzfgt | 18/02/2017

It's worse than nonsense, it makes me much less forgiving about it since his comments there about "black boys" are just as bad as--arguably worse than--the lyric itself.

bzfgt
  • 38. bzfgt | 18/02/2017

I suppose I should acknowledge that abominable interview in my notes. I hope I don't scare any newbie S1Ws off the Fall.

bzfgt
  • 39. bzfgt | 18/02/2017

God, the self-satisfied "come true," as though MES has had a prophetic vision of "black boys" on television...this is him at his worst, and I'm usually pretty liberal in my attitudes toward his interviews...some of my best friends are MES's...I mean, not actual MES's...

bzfgt
  • 40. bzfgt | 18/02/2017

Anyone who wants to complain that MES used to be a lucid interview and now he just rants should memorize that interview...

bzfgt
  • 41. bzfgt | 18/02/2017

"Prolapse" is good. I'm still not 100% convinced it is not "pole-axe." For one thing it'd make more sense, he's yelling "kill it!" and a pole-axe is a weapon, whereas "parallax" and "prolapse" are non sequitur...

dannyno
  • 42. dannyno | 18/02/2017

bzfgt: I think a hard line is necessary on the "obligatory" line. It's been much discussed on the FOF, and I've certainly been willing to criticise on this point - it may be intended as an attack on tokenism, but it's unsubtle and misdirected and inevitably comes across as racist, especially in the light of the quotes above. However, it seems fair to observe that although MES is being radically anti-social here and in the interview cited, he has made anti-fascist and anti-racist statements at other times and over a long time period (including critiquing Morrissey's National Front Disco)), and also made plain his love for various "black" music - reggae, blues and jazz. Big Youth, Bo Diddley and so on. We can judge his record as a whole, I think. But that doesn't excuse the drivel, whatever motivated it.

bzfgt
  • 43. bzfgt | 18/02/2017

Absolutely, Dan. I think his heart is in the right place in ways, and in the wrong place in others, and the two are intertwined in a complicated way that I could never disentangle. I'm not really offended by him and he is funny, but he does say shit one should not say. It should be noted that he is talking about saying things to wind up another interviewer in this same interview and then piles on a bunch more, so that is certainly a clue as to his intentions. But it's also too convenient a "get out of jail free" card and is like a blanket pass to say anything he wants!

Martin
  • 44. Martin | 04/03/2017

A brief note on MES's use of the word "black" (as for people, obviously). In The Fall's cover of The Searchers' Popcorn Double Feature we hear the words "That man is your teacher/No need to be alarmed/Not much". The original had "Black man is your teacher..."

There's a short discussion about the original lyrics here:

http://www.rickresource.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=8481

Two things are possible here. One, that MES misheard "black" for "that" and sang it thus in the cover version. Two, that he understood the connotations of the word "black" and therefore changed it for the innofensive word "that". Maybe - or maybe not, I'm just putting this there for the track record, as it were - this sheds a little more light on MES's (non)racist views.

Martin
  • 45. Martin | 04/03/2017

I should have said connotations of the word 'black' in this context; I don't think the word "black" in itself causes offence.

Martin
  • 46. Martin | 05/03/2017

And neither is "black" "nigger"...if you see what I mean!

bzfgt
  • 47. bzfgt (link) | 19/03/2017

I get it, he shies away from "black" but loves to say the 'N' word which I will not even deign to print.

Seriously though, that is interesting in its own right--sometimes he changes the most obvious lyrics, like "help me clear this trash" in "Junkman," which winds up "help me clear this track" and I think even something else the next time through. If there was ever a word not to mishear--it's about a junkman, and it rhymes with "ash"...and he does it to much for it to be unintentional all the time. But sometimes surely it is. You see why I don't annotate covers?

bzfgt
  • 48. bzfgt (link) | 19/03/2017

Despite what the lyric pages say, I just listened to the Searchers' song and they clearly seem to say "blind man is your teacher."

martin
  • 49. martin | 20/03/2017

Yes, that's sort of confirmed by this video and accompanying lyrics:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CaLfddXXHH4

Itchload
  • 50. Itchload | 28/03/2017

It's also probably worth noting that when MES resurrected The Classical in 2002, 2003 or so, he neglected to sing the "obligatory" line.

Found the "podomatic" interview, MES discusses his use of the word at 1hr 03 minutes. https://www.podomatic.com/podcasts/bobcast/episodes/2016-04-14T14_40_57-07_00

bzfgt
  • 51. bzfgt (link) | 01/04/2017

Thanks Itchload, I am very surprised that I didn't mention the omission since I knew that.

dannyno
  • 52. dannyno | 09/04/2017

"There is no culture is my brag"

I've been thinking about unpacking this a bit. But "no culture" as an assertion of one kind or another is common.

For example, from Jose Ortega Y Gasset's "The Revolt of the Masses" (1960):


Is it not a sign of immense progress that the masses should have "ideas," that is to say, should be cultured? By no means. The "ideas" of the average man are not genuine ideas, nor is their possession culture. Whoever wishes to have ideas must first prepare himself to desire truth and to accept the rules of the game imposed by it. It is no use speaking of ideas when there is no acceptance of a higher authority to regulate them, a series of standards to which it is possible to appeal in a discussion. These standards are the principles on which culture rests. I am not concerned with the form they take. What I affirm is that there is no culture where there are no standards to which our fellow-man can have recourse. There is no culture where there are no principles of legality to which to appeal. There is no culture where there is no acceptance of certain final intellectual positions to which a dispute may be referred. There is no culture where economic relations are not subject to a regulating principle to protect interests involved. There is no culture where aesthetic controversy does not recognize the necessity of justifying the work of art.


Now, that's not a "brag", but someone could pick up on that passage and decide, contrary to the intention, that actually they would affirm that there was no culture and a good thing too.

dannyno
  • 53. dannyno | 09/04/2017

The date given for "The Revolt of the Masses" in post 52 should be 1930, not 1960, of course.

bzfgt
  • 54. bzfgt (link) | 06/05/2017

Well, that's a dandy reference right there. I'm not aware offhand of any "no culture" passages but that one is pretty apposite.

bzfgt
  • 55. bzfgt (link) | 06/05/2017

I just realized I have things like "MES says in an interview" where "interview" is a hotlink, and no other information is given. When I come across these I need to see if the link is live, and if so give more information so that when it dies, someone will at least know where to look if they want to track it down....

Comment 29 demonstrates that this "parallax" thing is still a live issue. I still think "pole-axe" is most likely, as it makes the most sense...

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